[ 0℃ ] Group Sound Installation in Tokyo (Yokohoma) – Japan

dégelDégel ©France Jobin

Sound installation / Live | [0℃]

Friday, May 27 – Sunday, May 29, 2016
Sound installation: 1:00 pm - 9:00 pm ( Only 29 days are – 7:00 pm. )
General Admission: ¥1,000
Live ( Hideki UMEZAWA + Yoichi KAMIMURA ) : May 29, 7:30 pm –
General Admission: ¥1,800(One drink)
Minamiota 4-12-16, Minami-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa

Plan: Hideki UMEZAWA, Yoichi KAMIMURA
Design: Tadao KAWAMURA

We are collecting the sounds of ice and the documents related to them from artists all over the world, as we believe that the ice might solidify with the conditions of the lands and their memories. In this exhibition, we create an installation work and do a sound performance based on those collected sounds and documents, and attempt to fill the space of blanClass with the huge memories of the world captive in the ice.

[participating artists ]
Leah Beeferman
Marc Behrens
Hafdís Bjarnadóttir
Daniel Blinkhorn
Jez Riley French
Yukio Fujimoto
Shuta Hasunuma
Lily Hibberd
France Jobin
Yoichi Kamimura
Yoshihiro Kawasaki
Francisco López
Hiroaki Morita
Katie Paterson
Katsuhiro Saiki
Philip Samartzis
Yuko Shiraishi
Akio Suzuki
Seiji Takahashi
Hideki Umezawa
Jana Winderen

singulum LINE_075 – CHAIN D.L.K – (USA-Italy)


LINE_075 | CD + Digital | limited edition of 400 | February 2016

Electronic music composers get portrayed or portray themselves as icy mannequins, ataractic or ghostly entities or robotic hybrids. Even if there’s always a reason of similar (self)portraits and more or less aware representations, a certain humanity could look like a disrupting element of such a cliche, particularly when the technical canon seems coherent to a desired idea of excellence. When Montreal-based minimalist composer and sound artist France Jobin will gradually make her way into your eardrums, she doesn’t opt for brute attacks or epic introduction, but she lets a glimmering breathe of piano tones and light electronic buzzes peep out by a strategy that you’ll be tempted to label as shy. But such a shyness got matched to a grace, that is going to magnetically attract towards her surprisingly interesting sonic world, where sonic particles gently flow till the moment they sound like sparkling a significant process in a rarefied environment. France’s way to organize these fascinating sonic particles seems to have been inspired by quantum physics: in her own words, “quantum physics inspires me to draw a parallel between the fundamental building blocks of physics, sounds and music. I put field recordings through a series of editing and manipulation processes which result in very different sounds from their origins. These manipulations affect time, timbre, harmonics and the essence of each sound, whereas composition influences how they relate to each other.”. I don’t really know how these scientific matters influenced her sound, but I’m pretty sure that she managed to find a path by which minimal electronic music can gracefully sound even more immersive than over-stuffed sonic outputs.

Vito Camarretta

singulum LINE_075 – ATTN:Magazine (UK)


LINE_075 | CD + Digital | limited edition of 400 | February 2016

Singulum arrives like a retriggered memory: not a sudden and fully-formed epiphany, but an image that emerges through a process of molecular restoration, enacted with the same painstaking patience with which memories fade to begin with. Each piece flowers from buds of grainy piano loop or photic drone, revealing slithers of harmonic context and the electronic glitches of corrupted recollection (patches of missing detail, movements conducted in jerky, half-remembered ellipsis). The appearance of a new detail results in the careful reconfiguration of the entire image. The atmosphere shifts in hue. Beautiful chords become draped in gentle shadows of dissonance, while timbres turn dull as the high frequencies fall away. The more I remember, the more my rosy nostalgia becomes tinted by tiny turbulences and traces of nausea. The memory appears differently now; forever brightened, sharpened, dimmed, decelerated. I no longer have access to the original experience. Instead, Jobin plants me within pools of transient hypothesis, adjusting the soundscape as the act of remembering quietly draws circles of speculation around the truth.

I’ve come to love the way in which Jobin introduces sound into silence. On “m”, processed field recordings enter like dawn through a curtain gap, with sound streaming gracefully into space with ever-intensifying warmth. On “s”, an electronic chord seeps in like a pool of water spreading over the floor, crawling in from the right side of the frame. She exhibits a deep, almost reverent respect for the absence of sound, and even though her gestures are gentle in execution, they are also painstakingly deliberate. Chords appear like ink dropped from a pipette, billowing across the silence in slow motion, released at an angle that consciously directs the speed and angle of travel. Sound politely asks to proceed, and silence gracefully gives way.

Jack Chuter