Spellewauerynsherde Interpretations Various Sundry (2007)

June 2007

With the hope of being able to bypass the traditional commercial aspects of a recording label TRANS>PARENT RADIATION was formed in 2005 as a web-based sub-label of bremsstrahlung recordings. The releases are made available for free download for a period of time and then taken down and released as limited edition CDRs.

We are please to announce our first physical CDR.

TRANS001 Spellewauerynsherde, Interpretations Various & Sundry
Release date: 070621
Price: $9 ­ including shipping
Order direct: www.bremsstrahlung-recordings.org

Utilizing source material taken from found reel to reel recordings of Icelandic a capella lament songs made in the late 1960’s or early 1970’s 10 sound artists interpret these haunting sounds in their compositions. A CD LP by Akira Rabelais based on this source material can be found at Samadhi Sound. Reworkers include Fennesz, Kit Clayton, Taylor Deupree, Steve Roden, Stephen Mathieu, I8U and others.

The packaging includes a self-latching CD case created from a custom die-cut and the cover is hand stamped. It is a limited edition of 100 and will not be reissued. The CDRs themselves are labeled via the heat transfer process rather than inkjet printing to ensure text durability. The CDRs are silver on both sides. To view packaging click here

josh russell


Review – Extract, Portrait of Soundartists(nvo) 2007 – by Mike Oliver, smallfish

EXTRACT (2CD + book by Non Visual Objects)

Non Visual Objects is one of those labels that comes with something of a guarantee of quality with every release. With works from Steve Roden, Richard Chartier, Roel Meelkop, Tomas Phillips and Dean King and label co-owner Heribert Friedl, you can expect a certain level of presentation and sound that always pleases. This book is the logical extension, then, for a label that’s incredibly aesthetic and Extract really does make for a comelling read an, indeed, listen. A series of interviews and articles on the artists involved in the CDs that accompany the book, it looks in depth at techniques, motivations and the history of these artists. It’s all in black and white which rather suits the minimalist ethos of the label and is designed with great care and attention as well as being hard bound. Musically, the range on offer here is wonderful and artists such as Taylor Deupree, Richard Chartier, Bernhard Gunter, Nao Sugimoto (aka Mondii), Keith Berry, Dale Llyod, Will Montgomery, Steinbruchel, Jos Smolders, Steve Roden, John Hudak and more all contribute excellent works of sonic art. I could waffle on about this for hours if I had the space, but for now all I’ll say is that if you have any interest in this contemporary minimalist style of music you’ll find this to be a really exciting release indeed. Highly recommended.
(mike oliver, smallfish)

Review – Extract, Portrait of Soundartists(nvo) 2007 – by Frans de Waard, Vital Weekly

EXTRACT (2CD + book by Non Visual Objects)
Its possible to start with saying I don’t like to review compilations, and ‘Extract’ is a real difficult one. Two CDs, twenty-two tracks, by people that we may know from the world of microsound. That is twenty-two pieces of deep bass hum, crackles, processed field recordings and static hiss being filtered through Max or PD (depending who’s side you are on). It’s not easy to spot the highlight in this contest of ‘I am more silent than you’. That is a possible approach. But we should be better off approaching this from a more positive view. The owners of Non Visual Objects have already released a bunch of CDs and this book is a sort of introduction to the world which they are present in. The hardcover book has about 100 pages, and it’s four pages per artist. ‘Where are you from and what do you do’ is more or less the approach taken by the curators of the book. Not a book about theory, but a gentle introduction. Some people talk about their origins through the form of interviews, others write themselves about their work, which is not always about their music. It can be also about other forms of art they occupy themselves with, such as photography, installations or drawings. It adds a more human aspect to the music, seeing the photo’s of the artists and their personalized stories, which work best if they leave the format of an interview, and when they are really personal, like the ones of Steve Roden, John Hudak and Roel Meelkop. With a fresh look at the book (with excellent minimal design), we return to the CDs and listen with different ears. Here we now notice small differences in the various musics that are presented here. The sheer silence of Chartier, I8U, Dean King and Meelkop, but also the street sounds of Gunter, the radio looped minimalism of Hudak, the looped ambience of Taylor Deupree (who has a true trademark sound by now), drone like material from Dale Lloyd and Keith Berry, Jos Smolders’ musique concrete based on environmental sounds, or even a bit more noise based as with Will Montgomery. It’s the smaller variations perhaps to the untrained ear, but major ones to people who are used to microsound. Also included are Heribert Friedl, Richard Garet, Andy Graydon, Tomas Philips, Steinbruchel, Nao Sugimoto, Asmus Tietchens, Toshiya Tsunoda, Ubeboet and Micheal Vorfeld. One could wonder a bit over the selection here, which seems a bit arbitrary. Why no Francisco Lopez, Stephan Mathieu or Marc Behrens? But it’s perhaps too much of a personal selection, but at the same time it introduces us to some lesser known people such as Andy Graydon, Richard Garet and Micheal Vorfeld (who is better known in a different scene, I guess, that of improvised music). This is an incomplete overview but it may serve as an excellent introduction to the uninitiated as well as shedding some light on some of the people we know so well, but who don’t get so much coverage in the real press. As such the best book this year so far. (FdW)
Address: http://www.nonvisualobjects.com

Review – Extract, Portrait of Soundartists(nvo) 2007 – by Brian Marley, the wire

EXTRACT (2CD + book by Non Visual Objects)

As sound editing software has become ever more widely available, the number of artists working with sound has increased exponentially. Networks of artists who may live thousands of miles apart, and perhaps never meet except in the virtual realm, have become commonplace. One such network of electroacoustic artists is based in and around Nonvisualobjects, the Vienna-based label inaugurated by Raphael Moser and Heribert Friedl some two years ago, and Extract provides some of its participants with an opportunity to explain a number of things, including: what it is they do, why they do it, what musics and sounds have influenced them, what it is they value in art, what value their art (if indeed it is art) is to themselves and to society, and whether the sound pieces they make constitute music.
Because sound is often only one of the materials these artists work with, the editors have encouraged them to present other aspects of what they do. The chapters are, as they put it, collage-like and open to interpretation. There’s a tendency therefore to present information somewhat obliquely, as John Hudak does through a series of crudely hand-drawn self-portraits, which he considers analogous to the way he makes music. Roel Meelkop’s entry consists of a short piece of autobiographical fiction that wryly purports to explain how he became a sound artist. Bernhard Günter highlights a non-musical aspect of his work – his ‘photo walks’, illustrated by five of his highly abstract photographs – though he declares there’s no real distinction for him between audio and visual: “It . . . doesn’t make an essential difference whether I handle a sound sample in a digital recording system, an instrument in my hands, or a camera in front of my eye: my success or failure will always depend on my being able to enter the right state of mind”. Taylor Deupree emphasises one of the major themes that runs through the book, the importance of social networks, by presenting a visual diary consisting of 69 small photographs, taken during the four trips he made to Japan between 2003-05, almost all of which are snapshots of friends and colleagues in informal situations, only a fat handful of which are of performances or were taken at concert venues. It should perhaps be mentioned at this juncture that all of the visual illustrations in the book are monochrome, and of lower resolution than one might have wished for, but otherwise production values are high.
Needless to say, the reasons these sound artists give for making the work they do are as varied as the work itself. Sometimes it comes down to feeling uncomfortable playing traditional instruments, especially as children; or other influences creep in that won’t reconcile themselves with the music they hear around them. Keith Berry, for example, writes of the hot water tank in his childhood bedroom that fed the house’s central heating system, the noises of which fascinated him, and he helpfully includes a photograph of the water tank in question so we can see what he heard. Of present day influences, less is said; or perhaps it’s truer to say that what’s said is less revealing. Jos Smolders points up a particular dilemma in this regard: “Since the existence of the internet, the scope of what we can choose from is so wide that nothing can be outstanding. And if something does, for a moment, then immediately there are at least 100 others copying it, thereby obliterating the original”. He concludes, feelingly, “So, maybe it sounds a bit presumptuous, but I really haven’t a clue about my present day influences”.
Smolders may feel dispirited about the lack of outstanding work he gets to hear, but the two CDs of sound material that accompany the book don’t bear this out. Each of the 22 contributors has supplied a piece of sound/music, including (of those yet to be mentioned) Steve Roden, Ubeboet, Richard Garet, I8U, Asmus Tietchens, Richard Chartier, Will Montgomery, Steinbrüchel, Dean King, Heribert Friedl, Andy Graydon, Michael Vorfeld, Nao Sugimoto, Tomas Phillips, Dale Lloyd and Toshiya Tsunoda. Some of the pieces are, as the book’s title suggests, extracts from longer works (and, if not, one could argue they’re extracts from a lifetime’s work), none of which tops the nine minute mark. The most striking pieces, to my mind, are those by Graydon, Tsunoda, Berry, Smolders, Montgomery, Vorfeld and Tietchens. It’s perhaps inevitable that once all the texts have been read, the best reason for returning to this volume will be to listen to the CDs, but the book is nonetheless a valuable and extremely welcome resource.
(brian marley, the wire # 284)

Review – Hmmm Remix – by Frans de Waard, Vital Weekly


Perhaps it’s safe to assume that all people hum, at least every now and then. Humming to themselves, to a tune or to meditate. Kathy Kennedy, of whom I never heard, does group hummings for ‘sonic experimentation and meditation, for play and for physical well-being’. Recordings of this humming were given to a whole bunch of people in order to crank out some form of remix, which is clever thinking, me thinks, because it brings her work to a new audience. Kennedy is, I believe, from Montreal, so some of the Montreal posse are here, such as Helene Prevost, i8u but also Francisco Lopez, Kim Cascone, Thanos Chrysakis, Austici, and lesser known names, such as Doug van Nort, Magali Babin, Jonas Olesen, Margaret Schedel. Some of them use the humming of voices as a starting point to create electronic deviations of it, other use the voices as voices, and layered them, change the pitch etc. But all of the twelve remixes (the first track is a sort of documentary piece about humming and people are being interviewed) seem to be interested in creating densely, atmospheric music in which you can feel good. To create perhaps a similar effect as humming, to enter a relaxing state. Quite a nice compilation, but not always a big surprise.

Address: http://www.le-son666.com

(FdW, Vital Weekly, #614)

Hmmm Remix (2007)

Hmmm Remix

Humans and computers.
Organic and digital.
Soothing and stimulating.

Ahypnotic assortment of styles and approaches of digital composition byelectronic artists around the globe; each artist remixing the same 5minute recording of an intimate group of singers humming together.Luminaries in the field such as:

Kathy Kennedy + David Gutnick, Hélène Prévost, Steve McLeod, Austistici, Thanos Chrysakis, Francisco Lopez,
Margaret Schedel, Jonas Olesen, Bryce Beverlin 11,  Magali Babin, Kim Cascone, Doug Van Nort and .i8u.

HMMM Remix Compilation is part of a multi-layered project by sound artist Kathy Kennedy. It will culminate in a sonic tsunami, an event that will take place on St. Laurent st. between Sherbrooke and Mont-Royal on sat.June 16, from 3:30-4pm. We hope to hear the voices of 5000 citizens united by the sound of humming. For more info about this spectacular endeavour see:


Montreal 06.01.2007 – Mutek 2007

June 1st 2007


June 1, 2007 21:00 pm
59 Ste-Catherine Est

Cobblestone Jazz
Kalabrese and his Rumpelorchestra
Matthew Dear’s Big Hands
The Mole

For the occasion of the very promising NOCTURNE 3 showcase, the Metropolis will host a massive two-room event to kick-start the weekend.

In the main room, several of today’s best producers bring new band projects to the stage for an energetic showcase designed to celebrate the organic side of dance music. Hotly tipped Swiss producer Kalabrese and his Rumpelorchestra bring an innovative mix of techno and funk, while superstar DJ/producer Matthew Dear previews material from his new electronic pop album with his three-piece band, Big Hands. Montreal’s The Mole keeps the evening rolling with his infectious brand of disco-soul, before joining forces mid-set with the inimitable Cobblestone Jazz (Vancouver), a three-man electronic jam band led by none of other than Mathew Jonson.

Meanwhile, over in the Savoy Lounge, six experimental electronic musicians and two visual artists from Japan, New York, Paris, and Montreal will build a strange and fanciful soundtrack for the curious: O.Blaat, Sawako, Chika, Bubblyfish, Glomag, Decrepticon, Mec and i8u.